Art is a matter of the heart
  • Marie-Claire Greve

Marie-Claire Greve (1966) is a Dutch fine art photographer devoted to creating images inspired by her passion for nature and wildlife. Following a successful career in professional event management, she turned to photography in 2012 and has since worked in over several countries, including France, Iceland, Japan, South Africa and of course The Netherlands. Her abstract interpretations of the landscape and an eye for bringing out colourful shapes and forms in many of her subjects has brought her to the attention of fine art photography collectors throughout Europe. 

Curious by nature and not afraid to experiment with her camera, Marie-Claire often chooses unusual perspectives or angles for her distinctive compositions. “My personal preference is to work with anything that moves,” she explains, “and to make the most of soft, evocative light to achieve the subtle tones that I prefer in my images.” As well as the iconic wildlife of the African bush and savannah, Marie-Claire is also drawn to the more elementary features of the landscape, especially those wild places that have been shaped for centuries by wind and water.

There is also a philanthropic side to Marie-Claire’s photographic art. In 2017, she launched Alliance for Nature, a foundation that aims to create a shift in awareness about the interrelationship between humankind and nature, and consequently the growing importance to protect the natural world we live in. Through her photography, she seeks to inspire and connect people of all ages and ethnicities, as well as organizations active in the conservation of Earth’s precious biospheres, based on a philosophy of coexistence. She says: “The net worth of my artwork will be allocated to The Alliance for Nature and special assignments that aim to protect and preserve our natural world. I feel lucky to have found photography as the tool to share my experiences and feelings for nature. If we can better understand that we are as much part of nature as any other living species, we would soon realize that what we do to nature we do to ourselves.”